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alpine [2013/07/15 09:20] (current)
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 +Back to [[Travel]]
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 +Ideas for Alpine areas to visit
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 +Dolomites ​ South Tyrol (Alto Adige) ​
 +The Lombardy Region - north of Milano
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 +http://​www.spinuserhof.com/​anreise.html
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 +Valle d'​Aosta
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 +http://​ladyparmalade.wordpress.com/​2010/​07/​24/​hiking-and-ruminating-the-italian-alps/​
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 +http://​www.altabadia.org/​en-US/​dolomites_walking.html
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 +I LOVE Trento. I've been there three times in the last five years, and we're going again next year -- twice. (At the end of June!)
 +It has great restaurants,​ is a quaint, medium-sized city, and it has fantastic access to many, many place -- high in the mountains (Bondone, of course, Asiago, in fact every which way) and along the river courses (day-trips: Bolzano, ROvereto, even Bassano del Grappa is an easy train, as is Verona, but why go so far).
 +If you go, consider the Hotel America, odd as the name is. It's inexpensive,​ conveniently located, and the service is truly great.
 +If you pick Trento, let me know. I can tell you a cuple of restaurant ideas that are out of the way but out of this world.
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 +Travel to the Dolomites by train only will not get you very deep into the mountains or very high in elevation. The main rail line to Austria via the Brenner Pass goes through Trento, Bolzano, Bressanone. I think there is a spur line that goes up the Val Pusteria - to Dobbiaco maybe. To the east I don't know whether you can get much closer than Belluno by train. Augmented with bus travel, however you can get most anywhere in the Dolomites. We prefer driving - some really spectacular roads and fun driving (unless you get stuck behind a tour bus going up to one of the high passes). In past trips we have stayed in Bolzano, Castelrotto (near the Alpe di Siusi - a great hiking area), Ortisei and Selva in the Val Gardena, near Cortina d'​Ampezzo at the Passo Giau, and in Bressanone. Jim is right in that the region of Alto Adige/​Sudtirol (part of the Austro-Hungarian empire prior to WWI) primarily German is spoken and the character of the towns and the cuisine is much more Austrian/​Tirolean. The Trentino/​Veneto areas of the Dolomites have a more Italian character. ​
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 +If you intend to do any hiking, be aware that the summer hiking season in the Dolomites begins to wind down in the middle of September and by the end of the month many lifts/cable cars and rifugi are closed. Some of the cable cars at major passes are open later and will get you up to some high altitudes and incredible views. The Sass Pordoi lift at Passo Pordoi and the Lagazuoi lift at Passo Falzarego near Cortina should be operating through most of October.
  
 
alpine.txt · Last modified: 2013/07/15 09:20 (external edit)
 
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